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‘Grinch’ to visit Tupper Lightfoot Saturday morning

first_img Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Print Article Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson “We have a fun morning planned with the ‘How the Grinch Stole Christmas’ movie as the main event,” Lampley said “We’ll have Christmas coloring pages and the children will have an opportunity to make masks of Santa Claus and also the Grinch.”The children may also write their letters to Santa for mailing in the city’s North Pole bound mailbox. Lampley said Santa Claus will pay the children a visit and, there is a good possibility that the Grinch will also make an appearance at “Christmas at Tupper.” You Might Like Shelia Jackson Holiday Concert planned for December 14 Each year, around Christmas time, the Troy Arts Council presents the “Shelia Jackson and Friends Holiday Concert” as a way… read more ‘Grinch’ to visit Tupper Lightfoot Saturday morning By The Penny Hoarder Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Skip The children may have their pictures taken with Santa at no charge and, if the Grinch hangs around, he might be willing to have his picture taken with good little boys and girls.Theresa Trawick, library director, said “Christmas at Tupper” will be a lot of fun and all children are invited to spend the morning of December 8 at the Tupper Lightfoot Memorial Library. The library has a large selection of books for children to enjoy during Christmas vacation so it will be a good time to browse.center_img When a grumpy hermit hatches a plan to steal Christmas, the plan backfires on him. The grumpy old’ Mr. Grinch then begins to think, “Maybe Christmas doesn’t come from a store. Maybe Christmas, perhaps, means a little bit more.”The story of “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” will be told on screen at the Tupper Lightfoot Memorial Library in Brundidge during “Christmas at Tupper” from 9:30 until 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, December 8. “Christmas at Tupper” is designed for children ages 12 and under and all are invited, said Garneshia Lampley, Tupper children’s coordinator. Published 3:00 am Wednesday, December 5, 2018 Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Sponsored Content Latest Stories Book Nook to reopen Email the author By Jaine Treadwelllast_img read more

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50 years later: ‘One Giant Leap’ author on the impact of Apollo 11’s moon mission

first_imgNASA(WASHINGTON) — With the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, Charles Fishman, the author of One Giant Leap: The Impossible Mission that Flew Us to the Moon, spoke to ABC News about the drive to answer President John F. Kennedy’s famous 1961 challenge to put a man on the moon before the end of the decade.And he told the remarkable, little-known stories of the men and women behind the scenes who made that vision a reality.Until that time, going to the moon was the biggest undertaking not just by the United States, but that humans had ever attempted outside of the world wars. According to Fishman, “It wasn’t just one giant leap for the astronauts. It was one giant leap for the 400,000 people back on Earth who had to do the work to get the astronauts to the moon.”The space raceBy the time Kennedy outlined his goals for a space program, the Soviet Union’s space program was always one step ahead of the United States.That other superpower was the first to send a satellite, animals and humans into orbit, and Kennedy was looking to definitively re-establish American pre-eminence.“The race to the moon was born out of Cold War rivalry,” Fishman said.And at the end of a decade marked by the Vietnam War, anti-war protests, the Civil Rights movement and the women’s movement — the success of the Apollo 11 mission turned into a unifying moment, which enthralled and captured the imagination of a nation and a global audience.“Apollo reminded us what we were capable of when we worked together,” he added.The menThe first two men who walked on the moon, astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, had different approaches to their few minutes on the lunar surface. Fishman describes Armstrong as a “straight shooter,” while Buzz Aldrin was a “little wackier.”When Armstrong and Aldrin landed on the moon for the first time, they were actually scheduled to take a nap after being up from more than 20 hours.“They basically said, ‘Listen, we didn’t fly to the moon to go to sleep. We’re not going to sleep. We’re going to suit up and get outside,’” Fishman said.Aldrin, he said, spent three to four minutes racing around the moon “kangaroo-hopping.”Laying the foundation for human advancementFishman argues that Apollo laid the foundation for the digital revolution because of the intensity of computer development.“What happened was Microsoft and Apple and Google,” he said.Fishman points out that a lot of what is relied on now, and sometimes taken for granted, was pioneered in that era. The adoption of digital computing — sometimes referred to as the “Third Industrial Revolution” — marked a momentous shift.“One iPhone has more computing power than NASA had available, total, in all the computers they used during any particular space mission,” Fishman said.The biggest takeaway for Fishman is that eight years after Kennedy issued his challenge, Americans were walking on the moon.If someone called climate change an existential threat and issued a similar challenge to tackle it, Fishman said, the solutions are at hand.“There were 10,000 mysteries about flying to the moon,” Fishman said. “We didn’t know how to do it, and we did it. And so there is this element of, if we could go to the moon, can’t we solve the problems we have back on Earth?”His answer is “yes.”“It’s just that someone has to ask us to,” he said.  Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.,NASA(WASHINGTON) — With the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, Charles Fishman, the author of One Giant Leap: The Impossible Mission that Flew Us to the Moon, spoke to ABC News about the drive to answer President John F. Kennedy’s famous 1961 challenge to put a man on the moon before the end of the decade.And he told the remarkable, little-known stories of the men and women behind the scenes who made that vision a reality.Until that time, going to the moon was the biggest undertaking not just by the United States, but that humans had ever attempted outside of the world wars. According to Fishman, “It wasn’t just one giant leap for the astronauts. It was one giant leap for the 400,000 people back on Earth who had to do the work to get the astronauts to the moon.”The space raceBy the time Kennedy outlined his goals for a space program, the Soviet Union’s space program was always one step ahead of the United States.That other superpower was the first to send a satellite, animals and humans into orbit, and Kennedy was looking to definitively re-establish American pre-eminence.“The race to the moon was born out of Cold War rivalry,” Fishman said.And at the end of a decade marked by the Vietnam War, anti-war protests, the Civil Rights movement and the women’s movement — the success of the Apollo 11 mission turned into a unifying moment, which enthralled and captured the imagination of a nation and a global audience.“Apollo reminded us what we were capable of when we worked together,” he added.The menThe first two men who walked on the moon, astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, had different approaches to their few minutes on the lunar surface. Fishman describes Armstrong as a “straight shooter,” while Buzz Aldrin was a “little wackier.”When Armstrong and Aldrin landed on the moon for the first time, they were actually scheduled to take a nap after being up from more than 20 hours.“They basically said, ‘Listen, we didn’t fly to the moon to go to sleep. We’re not going to sleep. We’re going to suit up and get outside,’” Fishman said.Aldrin, he said, spent three to four minutes racing around the moon “kangaroo-hopping.”Laying the foundation for human advancementFishman argues that Apollo laid the foundation for the digital revolution because of the intensity of computer development.“What happened was Microsoft and Apple and Google,” he said.Fishman points out that a lot of what is relied on now, and sometimes taken for granted, was pioneered in that era. The adoption of digital computing — sometimes referred to as the “Third Industrial Revolution” — marked a momentous shift.“One iPhone has more computing power than NASA had available, total, in all the computers they used during any particular space mission,” Fishman said.The biggest takeaway for Fishman is that eight years after Kennedy issued his challenge, Americans were walking on the moon.If someone called climate change an existential threat and issued a similar challenge to tackle it, Fishman said, the solutions are at hand.“There were 10,000 mysteries about flying to the moon,” Fishman said. “We didn’t know how to do it, and we did it. And so there is this element of, if we could go to the moon, can’t we solve the problems we have back on Earth?”His answer is “yes.”“It’s just that someone has to ask us to,” he said.  Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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More to time than clock-watching

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Time and attendance data plays an important part of strategic planning in the workplace – but it is more than simply a study of the hours employees are in the officeClocking on is one of the labour force’s most enduring rituals, and has always been regarded as a key factor in monitoring productivity. But increasingly companies need to be able to use time and attendance data in strategic planning, which involves more than just recording the hours employees keep.“Many organisations address only one aspect of lost time, or else tackle the symptom and not the cause,” argues Christine Owen, healthcare and group benefits consultant at William M Mercer. “Instead of dealing only with sickness absence, they need a broader approach that also takes account of lost productivity, lost opportunities and staff turnover.”When all these factors are added together the total costs of lost time to a large company can be as much as 20 per cent of payroll, she says.Wandsworth Council came down heavily on exaggerated sickness claims last year, only to face a strike revolt by staff that would actually have aggravated the problem if it had carried out its plans. Owen points to this as an example of restricted vision that could have led to negative consequences.As well as the hard business issues, companies should take account of attitudes, perceptions and behaviours of both managers and employees. This means not only establishing the cause, frequency and cost of sickness absence, but also auditing such data as medical insurance claims, employers’ liability cases and lost business opportunities to obtain the full picture.Cause and effectsUnderstanding the cause and effects of sickness absence is just one of a range of issues that software vendors increasingly take account of, as they integrate time and attendance monitoring with HR systems in ways that enable it to be part of strategic decision making.The analysis capability built into the new generation of products is illustrated by IBM’s HR Access, which besides sending time-keeping details to payroll can now use them to help with project planning. For instance, the effect of absence and turnover on revenue can be established by comparing the data to the organisation’s competencies and objectives. The system also takes employees into account, referring to each individual’s skills and abilities.“Absence data is a key requirement for payroll but it also carries implications for turnover,” explains Steve Knapman, HR Access sales manager. “Those can be understood by identifying employees’ aspirations and the extent to which they are being met.”Keith Statham, managing director of Kronos Systems UK, agrees that the emphasis is shifting from traditional time keeping to managing lost time. He uses the term “frontline labour management”, arguing that managers and supervisors need tools to understand what is often a much more complex business than merely knowing the hours the workforce keeps.Often that involves integrating time data into other productivity indices. In distribution, for example, the number of items shipped can be compared to the number of hours worked or lost, providing an indication of performance levels. But that needs to be done continuously rather than at intervals, Statham emphasises, to avoid coming up with misleading averages.Managers need to be able to measure not just the time that a person is working, but also the type of activity. “The question is, does the amount of time I am investing in this relate to payback?” asks Statham. “If you are constantly putting more effort in than the income justifies then you need to address that, by definition increasing productivity and saving lost time.”SchedulingAs work patterns become more flexible managers have increasing difficulties with scheduling. Time can be lost not just by an employee arriving late or being off sick, but by being in the wrong place at the wrong time. More accurate rostering can also reduce overtime, which means a company is not paying over the odds at the end of the day to an employee who may have come in two hours late.That is particularly an issue in call centres, where managers have to plan shift manning against anticipated call frequency. That is often difficult because of their variable contracts and workloads, according to Graham Reinelt, managing director of hfx. “If a major car manufacturer does a mailshot the traffic will suddenly treble,” he points out.The solution is staff planning software that picks up previous call distribution data and calculates future needs. That is sent to an information terminal which employees can refer to when deciding which shifts to work.This type of approach is also increasingly being adopted by traditional sectors. Cargo Service Centre, an air-cargo hand-ling company at Heathrow, uses planning software provided by Smart PeopleTime to anticipate any shortfall resulting from holiday and absence. The system identifies a suitable replacement, ensuring that there is no disruption and minimising lost productivity. It also avoids having to ask employees to work long hours at short notice, a potential flash point.Mobile workersAnother growing need is to monitor the productivity of employees who work remotely. Here web technology can help: Smart PeopleTime has an on-line system that enables professional and mobile workers to record their activity by dialling into the company intranet. The software can also provide analysis, such as comparing the time charged to the client with revenue expected. It can show where time was not charged and indicate whether this is due to study leave, training, planning, selling or travelling.PR consultancy Hill and Knowlton acquired the system to monitor its 300 staff, who gain access from any remote PC. Finance manager Michael Pledge says, “The system can cope with high levels of data and provides us with the facility to analyse our working time better. It ensures that each client is receiving an accurate report of recorded time on their PR activities and it encourages staff to closely plan and monitor their own working hours.”Not all workers use a PC, however, and in these cases a handheld device is expected to be a favoured method. This is already technically possible with wireless application protocol (WAP) phones, although they are unlikely to be used for the purpose until the price comes down.But time-and-attendance vendors such as hfx are actively exploring the idea, which they say will be invaluable in sectors such as contract cleaning, for instance, where managers at present have little control over employees’ punctuality. As employers’ needs change according to ever-evolving work patterns, technology can usually be relied on to provide an appropriate solution. More to time than clock-watchingOn 11 Jul 2000 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Soft robots go for color, camouflage

first_imgLast year, a team of researchers led by George Whitesides, the Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor, broke new engineering ground when they developed soft, silicone-based robots inspired by creatures like starfish and squid.Now, they’re working to give those robots the ability to disguise themselves.As demonstrated in an Aug. 16 paper published in Science, researchers have developed a system — again, inspired by nature — that allows the soft robots to either camouflage themselves against a background, or to make bold color displays. Such a “dynamic coloration” system could one day have a host of uses, ranging from helping doctors plan complex surgeries to acting as a visual marker to help search crews following a disaster, said Stephen Morin, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and first author of the paper.“When we began working on soft robots, we were inspired by soft organisms, including octopi and squid,” Morin said. “One of the fascinating characteristics of these animals is their ability to control their appearance, and that inspired us to take this idea further and explore dynamic coloration. I think the important thing we’ve shown in this paper is that even when using simple systems — in this case we have simple, open-ended micro-channels — you can achieve a great deal in terms of your ability to camouflage an object, or to display where an object is.”“One of the most interesting questions in science is, ‘Why do animals have the shape and color and capabilities that they do?’ ” said Whitesides. “Evolution might lead to a particular form, but why? One function of our work on robotics is to give us, and others interested in this kind of question, systems that we can use to test ideas. Here the question might be: ‘How does a small crawling organism most efficiently disguise (or advertise) itself in leaves?’ These robots are test-beds for ideas about form and color and movement.”Just as with the soft robots, the “color layers” used in the camouflage start as molds created using 3-D printers. Silicone is then poured into the molds to create micro-channels, which are topped with another layer of silicone. The layers can be created as a separate sheet that sits atop the soft robots, or incorporated directly into their structure. Once created, researchers can pump colored liquids into the channels, causing the robot to mimic the colors and patterns of its environment.The system’s camouflage capabilities aren’t limited to visible colors though.By pumping heated or cooled liquids into the channels, researchers can camouflage the robots thermally (infrared color). Other tests described in the Science paper used fluorescent liquids that allowed the color layers to literally glow in the dark.“There is an enormous amount of spectral control we can exert with this system,” Morin said. “We can design color layers with multiple channels, which can be activated independently. We’ve only begun to scratch the surface, I think, of what’s possible.”The uses for the color-layer technology, however, don’t end at camouflage.Just as animals use color change to communicate, Morin envisions robots using the system as a way to signal their position, both to other robots, and to the public. As an example, he cited the possible use of the soft machines during search and rescue operations following a disaster. In dimly lit conditions, he said, a robot that stands out from its surroundings (or even glows in the dark) could be useful in leading rescue crews trying to locate survivors.Going forward, Morin said, he hopes to explore more complex systems that use multiple color layers to achieve finer control over camouflage and display colors, as well as ways to create systems — using valves and other controls — that would allow the robots to operate autonomously.“There are a number of directions this technology could go in,” he said. “Some of them are similar to the course we have taken thus far, but I think there are other aspects to explore – such as how the robots interact with their environment — that are related to what soft robots may be doing in the future.“What we hope is that this work can inspire other researchers to think about these problems and approach them from different angles,” he continued. “There are many biologists who are studying animal behavior as it relates to camouflage, and they use different models to do that. We think something like this might enable them to explore new questions, and that will be valuable.”last_img read more

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Top takeaways from 49ers HQ on Friday: QB trade remote

first_imgSANTA CLARA – Carrying two backups behind a healthy Jimmy Garoppolo is a luxury that tests the 49ers roster each time an injury arises elsewhere.As more and more quarterbacks around the league go down, the 49ers have insurance, which begs the question: Might they trade Nick Mullens or C.J. Beathard before the Oct. 29 deadline?San Francisco 49ers quarterbacks Jimmy Garoppolo (10) and Nick Mullens (4) practice during training camp at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif., on Thursday, Aug. 1, …last_img read more

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Hamilton fastest in rain-hit practice for Japanese GP

first_imgA win in Suzuka would move Hamilton a step closer to a third F1 title in four years with Mercedes and his fourth overall.Vettel, who had a new engine for the previous race in Malaysia, is a four-time winner in Japan.Rain is also forecast for Saturday’s qualifying but clear skies are expected for Sunday’s GP.ADVERTISEMENT Mavs rookie shows growth in 112-89 loss to Magic Ferrari driver Sebastian Vettel of Germany waits for the start of the rain delayed second practice session for the Japanese Formula One Grand Prix at Suzuka, Japan, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)SUZUKA, Japan — Formula One championship leader Lewis Hamilton clocked the fastest lap in a rain-hit second practice session for the Japanese Grand Prix on Friday, when only five drivers set a timed lap.After a lengthy delay, Mercedes driver Hamilton went quickest in the afternoon practice with a lap of 1 minute, 48.719 seconds, .799 seconds ahead of Esteban Ocon for Force India.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games LATEST STORIES Ocon’s teammate Sergio Perez and the Williams duo of Felipe Massa and Lance Stroll were the only other drivers to get in a timed lap in the abbreviated afternoon session.Ferrari driver Sebastian Vettel was fastest in the morning practice, which was dry until a light rain started to fall near the end of the session.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutWith five GP races remaining, Hamilton leads Vettel by 34 points in the driver championship.Hamilton has won twice before in Suzuka, in 2014 and 2015, and was runner-up to former Mercedes teammate Nico Rosberg in last year’s race. BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMCcenter_img Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary MOST READ Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Read Next View comments Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong Citylast_img read more

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10 months agoArsenal inform Juventus of Ramsey January price

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Arsenal inform Juventus of Ramsey January priceby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal have informed Juventus they can sign Aaron Ramsey this month.The midfielder, off contract in June, is understood to have settled pre-contract terms with Juve.The Wales international has agreed to a €6.5m-a-year deal.And Gazzetta.it says Arsenal have told Juve they can sign Ramsey immediately for £20m.Juve’s board are now weighing up whether to match Arsenal’s valuation. last_img read more

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Alfa Laval Inks Deals with Two Owners for BWT Systems

first_imgzoom Swedish provider of specialized products and engineering solutions Alfa Laval signed in June frame agreements with two different shipowners for the supply of its ballast water treatment systems (BWTS).As informed, the systems will be delivered during a three-year period and retrofitted on tankers and bulk carriers.The fleet orders were received from undisclosed parties, a tanker operator in the Middle East and a bulk carrier operator in Europe, which will time the booking of individual BWTS orders with the scheduled dry docking of their vessels. Alfa Laval said it will make the first of its PureBallast system deliveries to the shipowners during the latter part of 2017.“The Ballast Water Management Convention enters into force on September 8 of this year and these frame agreements are a clear sign that the ballast water treatment market is moving forward,” Kristina Effler, Manager Global Business Management, Alfa Laval PureBallast, said. “Shipowners are beginning to look beyond individual installations towards long-term solutions that will ensure compliance for their entire fleet,” Effler added.The framework agreements Alfa Laval has signed for PureBallast cover 45 and eight systems respectively, many of which will handle a significant ballast water flow. The first order includes 22 systems with capacities of 2,000 m3/h or 3,000 m3/h, while the second order comprises four systems of 1500 m3/h and an additional four of 3000 m3/h, according to Alfa Laval.Alfa Laval received BWT certificate from the United States Coast Guard Marine Safety Center in December 2016.last_img read more

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Ontario takes big step towards First Nations policing with historic bill

first_imgWillow Fiddler APTN NewsFirst Nations policing in Ontario is one step closer to being considered an essential service after the Safer Ontario Act was passed on Thursday.Bill-175 states First Nations can apply to be a designated police board responsible for policing in an area under the Police Services Act.This means First Nations police services could be protected under the same legislated policing standards as municipal and provincial police services.Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) called the passing of the bill a historic day and a result of years of negotiating the legislative framework that could mandate the Nishnawbe Aski Police Service (NAPS) – the country’s largest First Nations police force.“This legislation will ensure that NAN First Nations will have access to the same level of policing as the rest of Ontario,” said Grand Chief Alvin Fiddler in a news release.NAN has been in a tripartite agreement with the province and Canada since 1994 when NAPS was created.Since then, First Nations leaders in northern Ontario have been calling for equitable policing for its communities.“It’s a huge development, after all the time, Ipperwash, everything else. This is very big,” said Julian Falconer, legal counsel for NAN, referring to the 1995 Ipperwash Crisis in which Stony Point First Nation occupied land the federal government had appropriated for military use.“There’s actual protections in the act to retain the Indigenous identity and become a legislated police service just like any other police service in the province,” Falconer said.However, the challenges of First Nations policing hasn’t been so much the cultural aspects but the chronic resource and funding inadequacies that leave officers and communities feeling unsafe.In 2016, all but one of the 135 officers with NAPS voted in favor of strike action. They were frustrated and fed up with low pay and poor working conditions that did not meet standards because there were none.Under the First Nations Policing Program, some detachments have operated with no running water or heat and officers are required to work, often times alone, with no immediate back up in the 35 First Nations communities served by NAPS.The chronic inadequacies have been documented in various reports and recommendations from public inquests like the one for Lena Anderson, a young mother from Kasabonika First Nation who died by suicide when she was detained and left alone in the back of a police truck in 2013.In April 2017, the province offered First Nations policing full wage parity with provincial police.The Safer Ontario Act was tabled in the legislature in November 2017.“Safety backed by the rule of law will ensure that policing by our officers will be equitable to other police services in this province. This will go a long way to improving the health and safety of our communities,” said NAPS board chairman Mike Metatawabin.last_img read more

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